Meiji government

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  • Japanese: 明治政府 (meiji seifu)

The government of the Meiji period consisted primarily of the Meiji Emperor, a series of officials and apparatuses that governed in his name, and the National Diet.

The Diet (from Latin dieta for "public assembly"), as established by the Meiji Constitution in 1889, consisted of two houses: The House of Peers, and the House of Representatives. The upper house was composed of members of the kazoku aristocracy, while the lower house was elected by a group of tax-paying landowners who numbered roughly 450,000 men, or roughly 1.1% of the total Japanese population.

The Emperor held power over foreign relations and the military, as well as the power to open, recess, or dissolve the Diet, to issue his own edicts, and to veto decisions made by the legislature. Furthermore, the government's cabinet ministers, including the Prime Minister, were responsible to the Emperor, not to the Diet. The Diet's chief power under this system was to coordinate budgets; however, if the Diet was unable to come to a decision regarding a new budget, the previous year's budget would be automatically renewed.

The Emperor was the only one with the power to initiate consideration of changes to the constitution, but aside from exercising certain other powers, for the most part, he was distanced from actual governance & administration. Instead, the government was administered, and legislative decisions decided, by the Privy Council, the Cabinet, the Diet, and the general staff. The constitution did not provide for the mechanisms of interaction between these bodies, however, and so in practice, considerable political power remained in the hands of the genrô (Elder Statesmen, chiefly including those prominent in the Meiji Restoration or the establishment of Meiji institutions).

Elections

References

  • Conrad Schirokauer, David Lurie, and Suzanne Gay, A Brief History of Japanese Civilization, Wadsworth Cengage (2013), 180.