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The kingdom's coffers being already depleted by his father's campaigns of temple building, lavish entertainments, and ritual and ceremony, this would come to be seen in later generations as an extravagance, and an unnecessary drain on resources.
 
The kingdom's coffers being already depleted by his father's campaigns of temple building, lavish entertainments, and ritual and ceremony, this would come to be seen in later generations as an extravagance, and an unnecessary drain on resources.
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Shô Toku died in 1469, with no obvious successor. He was succeeded by the royal treasurer, Kanamaru, who after being chosen by a council of the top court elders took the throne as King [[Sho En|Shô En]], marking the beginning of the Second Shô Dynasty. Histories such as the ''[[Chuzan Seikan|Chûzan Seikan]]'' and other accounts created under the latter dynasty describe Shô Toku as an evil and depraved ruler, lacking the [[Mandate of Heaven]], a man filled with violence and cruelty. Other tales tell of his infatuation with a priestess of [[Kudaka Island]], and that his dalliance with her provided the opportunity for Kanamaru's rebellion. It is these same sources, written by officials in service to Shô En's descendants, which also emphasize Shô En's virtue and legitimacy. According to some of these sources, Toku's line was considered so tainted by his wickedness that officials sought out his 7-8 year old heir, who had been in hiding at [[Madanmui gusuku]] along with his mother (the queen), wet nurse, and others, and slaughtered them all, asking a supposedly "greatly surprised" Kanamaru if he would take the throne instead.<ref>Smits, ''Maritime Ryukyu'', 122-123.</ref>
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Shô Toku died in 1469, with no obvious successor. He was succeeded by the royal treasurer, Kanamaru, who after being chosen by a council of the top court elders took the throne as King [[Sho En|Shô En]], marking the beginning of the Second Shô Dynasty. Histories such as the ''[[Chuzan Seikan|Chûzan Seikan]]'' and other accounts created under the latter dynasty describe Shô Toku as an evil and depraved ruler, lacking the [[Mandate of Heaven]], a man filled with violence and cruelty. Other tales tell of his infatuation with a priestess of [[Kudaka Island]], and that his dalliance with her provided the opportunity for Kanamaru's rebellion. It is these same sources, written by officials in service to Shô En's descendants, which also emphasize Shô En's virtue and legitimacy. According to some of these sources, Toku's line was considered so tainted by his wickedness that officials sought out his 7-8 year old heir, who had been in hiding at [[Madanmui gusuku]]<ref>It is unclear whether this is a reference to Madanmui utaki, a sacred space within the Kyô-no-uchi at [[Shuri castle]], or an altogether separate site.</ref> along with his mother (the queen), wet nurse, and others, and slaughtered them all, asking a supposedly "greatly surprised" Kanamaru if he would take the throne instead.<ref>Smits, ''Maritime Ryukyu'', 122-123.</ref>
    
==References==
 
==References==
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