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Adams was granted a [[shuinsen|red seal trading license]] by the shogunate, and traveled to [[Ayutthaya]] (Siam) on several occasions in [[1615]]-[[1616]], aboard his ship the ''[[Sea Adventure]]'',<ref>Geoffrey Gunn, ''History Without Borders: The Making of an Asian World Region, 1000-1800'', Hong Kong University Press (2011), 223.</ref> as well as to [[Hoi An]] (in Vietnam) in [[1617]], and [[Ryukyu Kingdom|Ryûkyû]] on at least one occasion. Cocks, the first head of the London Merchant's Company's operations in Japan, visited Adams at Henmi in [[1616]].
 
Adams was granted a [[shuinsen|red seal trading license]] by the shogunate, and traveled to [[Ayutthaya]] (Siam) on several occasions in [[1615]]-[[1616]], aboard his ship the ''[[Sea Adventure]]'',<ref>Geoffrey Gunn, ''History Without Borders: The Making of an Asian World Region, 1000-1800'', Hong Kong University Press (2011), 223.</ref> as well as to [[Hoi An]] (in Vietnam) in [[1617]], and [[Ryukyu Kingdom|Ryûkyû]] on at least one occasion. Cocks, the first head of the London Merchant's Company's operations in Japan, visited Adams at Henmi in [[1616]].
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He died of illness in [[1620]], in Hirado. There is a grave in Henmi (now [[Yokosuka]] City), called "Anjin-zuka" and said to be his, though it also may be that of his son Joseph; in either case, the neighboring grave is believed to be that of his wife, Oyuki. Following Adams' death, Joseph inherited his red seal license, his fief, and the name "Miura Anjin," and continued to trade for a time under that name and license.<ref>[[Marius Jansen]], ''China in the Tokugawa World'', Harvard University Press (1992), 19.</ref> In [[1633]], Miura (Joseph) was to be only one of seven families to still hold a ''shuin'' license.
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He died of illness in [[1620]], in Hirado. There is a grave in Henmi (now [[Yokosuka]] City), called "Anjin-zuka" and said to be his, though it also may be that of his son Joseph; in either case, the neighboring grave is believed to be that of his wife, Oyuki. Following Adams' death, Joseph inherited his red seal license, his fief, and the name "Miura Anjin," and continued to trade for a time under that name and license.<ref>[[Marius Jansen]], ''China in the Tokugawa World'', Harvard University Press (1992), 19.</ref> He made at least five trips to Southeast Asia in 1624-1635.<ref>Leupp, 66.</ref> In [[1633]], Miura (Joseph) was to be only one of seven families to still hold a ''shuin'' license.
    
There is a marker on the site of his [[Edo]] (now Tokyo) mansion; the address is Chûô-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 1-10-8. Until the beginning of the Shôwa Period (1926-1989) the area was called "Anjin-chô"; there is still an "Anjin-dôri" ("Anjin Street") there. There is also an annual festival in his honor, held in Itô, [[Shizuoka Prefecture]], called ''Anjin Matsuri''.
 
There is a marker on the site of his [[Edo]] (now Tokyo) mansion; the address is Chûô-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 1-10-8. Until the beginning of the Shôwa Period (1926-1989) the area was called "Anjin-chô"; there is still an "Anjin-dôri" ("Anjin Street") there. There is also an annual festival in his honor, held in Itô, [[Shizuoka Prefecture]], called ''Anjin Matsuri''.
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