Changes

From SamuraiWiki
Jump to navigationJump to search
m
link
Line 30: Line 30:  
Okinawans in this period also began to form strongly Okinawan congregations for both Buddhist and Christian worship. The Jikôen Temple, which remains today a major center for Okinawan cultural activities in Honolulu, was founded in 1935, while the Christian Reimei Kyôkai (Church of the Dawn) was established in Palama around the same time.
 
Okinawans in this period also began to form strongly Okinawan congregations for both Buddhist and Christian worship. The Jikôen Temple, which remains today a major center for Okinawan cultural activities in Honolulu, was founded in 1935, while the Christian Reimei Kyôkai (Church of the Dawn) was established in Palama around the same time.
   −
Meanwhile, many Okinawans began to find success opening small businesses, many of them using funds from ''tanomoshi'' groups.<ref>''Tanomoshi'' groups, common among the Japanese community as well, collected up money from all the members, and gave the total to a single member, whether by lottery or by some other system, allowing individuals, with the support of their fellow Okinawans, to amass enough money to pay off debts, open a business, fund weddings or funerals, or the like.</ref> According to one estimate, by 1941, Okinawans owned 80% of the cafés and restaurants in Honolulu. The vast majority of these were small "mom and pop" operations, but by the end of the 1940s, some Okinawans found success in much larger ventures. To name just two examples, State Poultry Processors, which remains prominent today, was started by Uezu Yasuo in 1943, and Times Supermarket, which today has 24 locations across the state, was started by two brothers named Teruya in 1949.
+
Meanwhile, many Okinawans began to find success opening small businesses, many of them using funds from ''[[tanomoshi ko|tanomoshi]]'' groups.<ref>''Tanomoshi'' groups, common among the Japanese community as well, collected up money from all the members, and gave the total to a single member, whether by lottery or by some other system, allowing individuals, with the support of their fellow Okinawans, to amass enough money to pay off debts, open a business, fund weddings or funerals, or the like.</ref> According to one estimate, by 1941, Okinawans owned 80% of the cafés and restaurants in Honolulu. The vast majority of these were small "mom and pop" operations, but by the end of the 1940s, some Okinawans found success in much larger ventures. To name just two examples, State Poultry Processors, which remains prominent today, was started by Uezu Yasuo in 1943, and Times Supermarket, which today has 24 locations across the state, was started by two brothers named Teruya in 1949.
    
As was the case in the Japanese community as well, it became not uncommon in the 1930s for children to be sent to Okinawa for schooling, returning to Hawaii afterwards and coming to be known as ''kibei'' ("returned to America").
 
As was the case in the Japanese community as well, it became not uncommon in the 1930s for children to be sent to Okinawa for schooling, returning to Hawaii afterwards and coming to be known as ''kibei'' ("returned to America").
contributor
26,702

edits

Navigation menu