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The domain's local administrative office, or ''bansho'', in the town was relocated in [[1711]] to a more prominent location which allowed officials to throw open the doors and look out over the waterfront, flanked by [[yumi|longbows]] and thus presenting an impressive visage as well to those looking up at them.<ref>Dusinberre, 21.</ref> At that time, the population of the town is estimated at roughly 140 households, comprised of a total of less than one thousand people.<ref>Dusinberre, 23.</ref> The town was also home to three [[teahouses]], and an office overseeing the operations of the ''[[koshini-gata]]'' system of domain-commissioned warehouses, as well as roughly twelve ''[[tonya|ton'ya]]'' (private shipping agents) each of which specialized in the storage and shipment of particular goods from different provinces, and bore names such as Awa-ya, Kaga-ya, Higo-ya, and Nagasaki-ya. Each also maintained lodgings for ''[[kitamaebune]]'' ship captains & crews.<ref>The relationship between the name of the ''ton'ya'' operation and the goods or provinces with which they dealt is unclear. Dusinberre, 27.</ref>
 
The domain's local administrative office, or ''bansho'', in the town was relocated in [[1711]] to a more prominent location which allowed officials to throw open the doors and look out over the waterfront, flanked by [[yumi|longbows]] and thus presenting an impressive visage as well to those looking up at them.<ref>Dusinberre, 21.</ref> At that time, the population of the town is estimated at roughly 140 households, comprised of a total of less than one thousand people.<ref>Dusinberre, 23.</ref> The town was also home to three [[teahouses]], and an office overseeing the operations of the ''[[koshini-gata]]'' system of domain-commissioned warehouses, as well as roughly twelve ''[[tonya|ton'ya]]'' (private shipping agents) each of which specialized in the storage and shipment of particular goods from different provinces, and bore names such as Awa-ya, Kaga-ya, Higo-ya, and Nagasaki-ya. Each also maintained lodgings for ''[[kitamaebune]]'' ship captains & crews.<ref>The relationship between the name of the ''ton'ya'' operation and the goods or provinces with which they dealt is unclear. Dusinberre, 27.</ref>
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Along with neighboring Murotsu and a handful of other Chôshû fishing villages, Kaminoseki also enjoyed a privileged position as a designated ''tateura'' port. Fishermen from these villages enjoyed certain privileges in fishing in certain waters, but were also obligated to offer certain forms of assistance to drifting ships or castaway sailors, as well as unloading or otherwise serving the ''daimyô's'' ships when they came to port.<ref name=hardtimes21/>
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Along with neighboring Murotsu and a handful of other Chôshû fishing villages, Kaminoseki also enjoyed a privileged position as a designated ''tateura'' port. Fishermen from these villages enjoyed certain privileges in fishing in certain waters, but were also obligated to offer certain forms of assistance to drifting ships or castaway sailors, as well as unloading or otherwise serving the ''daimyô's'' ships when they came to port.<ref>Dusinberre, 21.</ref>
    
Today, the town is perhaps most known for the nuclear power plant which was proposed to be constructed in the 1980s, and which as a result of local protests, has been delayed and delayed, essentially blocked, and today more than 30 years later still has not been built; many of those opposing the construction of the power plant argue that they do so, in part at least, in order to protect their hometown (''furusato''), though there are also many in favor of the power plant who argue similarly that its construction will help revive the town, which has seen considerable decline as have many rural areas in Japan in recent decades.<ref>Dusinberre, 7-9.</ref>
 
Today, the town is perhaps most known for the nuclear power plant which was proposed to be constructed in the 1980s, and which as a result of local protests, has been delayed and delayed, essentially blocked, and today more than 30 years later still has not been built; many of those opposing the construction of the power plant argue that they do so, in part at least, in order to protect their hometown (''furusato''), though there are also many in favor of the power plant who argue similarly that its construction will help revive the town, which has seen considerable decline as have many rural areas in Japan in recent decades.<ref>Dusinberre, 7-9.</ref>
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