TOKUGAWA

SHÔGUNATE

 

#
Sh˘gun
Life
Reign
House
1
Ieyasu
1543-1616 1603-1605
Main
2
Hidetada
1574-1632 1605-1623
Main
3
Iemitsu
1604-1651 1623-1651
Main
4
Ietsuna
1641-1680 1651-1680
Main
5
Tsunayoshi
1646-1709 1680-1709
Main
6
Ienobu
1622-1712 1709-1712
Main
7
Ietsugu
1709-1716 1713-1716
Main
8
Yoshimune
1684-1751 1716-1745
Kii
9
Ieshige
1711-1761 1745-1760
Kii
10
Ieharu
1737-1786 1760-1786
Kii
11
Ienari
1773-1841 1787-1837
Hitotsubashi
12
Ieyoshi
1793-1853 1837-1853
Hitotsubashi
13
Iesada
1824-1854 1853-1858
Hitotsubashi
14
Iemochi
1846-1866 1846-1866
Hitotsubashi
15
Yoshinobu
1837-1913 1866-1867
Mito

Note on Houses: After founding the Tokugawa shôgunate, Ieyasu established three houses that would offer heirs in the event that the main Tokugawa line was unable to furnish one. These included the Kii, Mito, and Owari, known as gosanke. By the late 18th century, three branch families would be established. Known as the gosankyô, these included the Hitotsubashi, Shimizu, and Tayasu. The Hitotsubashi and Tayasu were founded by sons of Tokugawa Yoshimune; the Shimizu family was founded by Tokugawa Shigeyoshi, a son of shôgun Ieshige. The gosankyô held no fiefs of their own (though they were afforded a sizable yearly income) and were served by hatamoto, direct retainers of the shôgunate. They were, however, eligble to provide heirs to the shôgunate. The last shôgun, Yoshimune, was born into the Mito house but was adopted into the Hitotsubashi in 1847. The Owari Tokugawa, established by Ieyasu's 7th son, Yoshinao, was never called upon to provide an heir to the shôgunate.